Eko, Eko

Eko, Eko Azarak
Eko, Eko Zamelak
Eko, Eko Aradia
Eko, Eko Cernunnos (Karnayna)
Bagabi lacha bachabe
Lamac cahi achababe
Karellyos

Lamac, Lamac Bachalyas
Cabahagy sabalyos
Baryolos

Lagoz atha cabyolas
Samahac et famolas
Hurrahya!

Harrison writes:
a possible ritual word Basque English original
Eko eho kill, digest, grind
Azarak Azaroac (the) November = Samhain
Zamilak zamariac (the) horse
or) Zomelak (or) zaramat I shall transport thee
thyself
Bagabi bahe-gabe without a sieve
(or) bah’gabe

Harrison mentions that “in many a witch trial, the ability of the witches to transport themselves in a sieve is mentioned”. He also mentions that “before the discovery that hay and root-crops can feed animals through the winter, November was the time for the feast which followed the(compulsory) killing of all but the basic stock”.

Further:
possible ritual word Basque English original
Lacha laxa to wash
(pronounced either latsa/lasha)
bachabi bachera plates and dishes
Karellyos garallaz with sand
pronounced garalyaz)
Lamac lanac (the) work
Bachalyas Bacheraz with plates and dishes
Cabahagy khoporagei destined for the drinking cup
Sabalyos sabelaz with the stomach, entrails, belly, etc.
Baryolos balijoaz if they went/were to go/had gone
Lagoz lakhaz (with) a full measure/quantity
atha eta(?) and
Cabyolas khoporaz in the goblet/drinking vessel
Samahac semiac the sons
famolas familiaz (who are) with the family
Hurrahya (ritual cry) ***

*** Bodin (writing 1604/1616) reports the invitation to the witch dance
began with “Har, Har, Hou, Hou, danse ici …” Hou was a local deity;
‘Haro’ is called by Channel Islander who asks for justice.

His ‘attempt’ at translation (he claims not to be sure) of the following:

Eko, Eko Azarak
Eko Zamelak

Bagabi lacha bachabe
Lamac cahi achababe
Karellyos

Lamac, Lamac Bachalyas
Cabahagy sabalyos
Baryolos

Lagoz atha cabyolas
Samahac et famolas
Hurrahya!

is as follows <my addition is in angle brackets>:

‘Kill (the victim for the feast in) in November <Samhain>, kill!
I shall transport thee there myself, without the aid of a sieve
to scour the plates and dishes with sand; work (which must
be done) with those plates and dishes. (We shall meet our
friends) ready for the drinking cup if they shall go (to the Feast),
their bellies full with quaffing from the drinking-cup. O, Sons (of
the Master) with your Families, (shout his praises with the cry:)
‘HURRAHYA’!”

I see that Samahac possibly means Samhain. Famolas could mean famous?
I further looked into Basque langueage. Euskara is the language of the Basque people and is an inflected language. The origin is unknown and it is not an Indo-European language. The Basque language developed “In Situ” in the land of primitive Basques. It is considered to be a very old language and was finally written in the 16th century. Because it took this long was it was considered a forbidden language where children and adults were actually punished using the language. Basques were Pagan. Majus are wizards and pagans. Aquitanicus of Southwestern Gaul spoke an ancestral form of Basque.

There is also a Basque Witches song.
Har Har hou hou!
Eman hetan! Eman hetan!
Har Har hou hou!
Janicot! Janicot! Janicot! Janicot!
Har har hou hou!
Yona Gorril, Yona Gorril
Akhera Goiti, Akhera Beiti

Used w/Permission from Toni B, at Traditional Stregheria Yahoo Group.


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